Tagged fly garage

Concept Development

After flying free for a while in the Fly Garage it is time to land and start narrow down what ideas to continue to develop into concepts. Like we do at Hyper Island we have been very open during the initial idea generation phase but now it is time to close for new ideas and develop the ones we have.

Tomorrow we will present the concepts to our target group to see what they like and don’t like. Jessica gave us some good tips on how to develop concepts for a first run of presentations and feedback that I would like to share with you:

1.
Use few words and more images to explain the concept.

2.
Only present one idea per concept. Remember that it is the first time your audience will hear the idea and many small ideas in one concept can be confusing.

3.
Keep the concepts you present distinct. If two concepts are similar it is better to kill one to make the best one stand out.

4.
Avoid advertising jargon. Your target group doesn’t know the vocabulary or care about it.

5.
Brand the concepts for the test. Try to present it the way it will look irl when it is done.

6.
Show the actual campaign. You don’t have to show them mood boards or strategy, only what they will actually see in the streets/online.

Thank you for following my blog! Hope you feel that you can learn something! I try to share things I learned here as often as possible. Even if you already know a lot of stuff I write about, writing about things helps me understand it better.

Learnings from Deeplocal

Last night my friend asked me what I’ve learned from Deeplocal. That’s what Hyper friends are for, reminding me to reflect! Really need to build that reflection application… I always write down good questions to ask myself when working on new ideas and I need to collect them somewhere.

Anyway, here we go! The examples are from the Chalk Bot by Deep local.

Learnings top 3:

1.
It’s all about doing something that people want to use, because it is fun or useful, and not trying to force them to do something they aren’t already doing. In Tour de France people where already writing messages on the streets for the races. When the helicopters are filming the race from above millions of people can see the messages.

2.
Prototype early. You don’t know what the innovation will be like until you can try it. You can talk about the concept and the idea for days but it might not make it better. Time is money. When doing the chalk bot, Deeplocal produced a working prototype in only two days and could assure their client it would work.

3.
Tell a story – the innovation should be a story in itself! The chalk bot is a good example of this. By driving the same road as the race while painting messages to cancer patients it tells the story of Lance Armstrong fighting his cancer.

Thank you Deep Local! The last two days was among the most giving in the Fly Garage!